Enfield Logo
Follow us   Facebook Twitter
Have your say

Enfield Town Scheme

This is an excellent opportunity for Enfield Town to be transformed from a motor vehicle dominated environment to a more attractive, people-friendly destination with the ability to draw in visitors both locally and from a much wider catchment area.

Key Dates

Consultation is Closed
Runs from 25 Sep 2015 to 18 Dec 2015

Exhibition for Business Owners / Managers | Thu 24 Sep 2015
Public Exhibition (3pm - 8pm) | Fri 25 Sep 2015
Public Exhibition (10am - 4pm) | Sat 26 Sep 2015

Overview of the scheme

This is an excellent opportunity for Enfield Town to be transformed from a motor vehicle dominated environment to a more attractive, people-friendly destination with the ability to draw in visitors both locally and from a much wider catchment area. Under these plans, parts of the one-way system would be returned to two-way operation bringing in a wide range of benefits. These include:

  • a safer and more appealing walking environment (one-way streets tend to encourage more ‘weaving’, faster acceleration, and higher speeds).
  • a sufficiently high quality cycling environment to attract a much wider cross-section of local residents and workers than the current cycling market (mainly male commuters in their 20s, 30s and 40s).
  • In one of the options there is an easier to understand bus service (bus stops serving opposite directions can be on the same stretch of road when it’s two-way)

 

In recent years as transport priorities change, many town centre one-way systems around the country have been returned to two-way operation. This helps to transform them into more attractive, people-friendly destinations, and this is Enfield Town’s opportunity to reap the benefits of such a transformation. Traffic dominated roads become thriving, people-friendly streets.

The proposed schemes would enable many of the short car journeys currently taken to the town centre to be switched to walking, bus or cycling. These forms of transport make a much more efficient use of limited highway space.

The schemes would include a combination of high quality cycle lanes and cycle paths on roads in the town centre. Opportunities will also be taken to improve public spaces to make them brighter, safer and less cluttered, in keeping with the latest thinking in transport and town planning.

Which options are part of the consultation?

Two options have been shortlisted for Enfield Town, Option 1 and Option 6a.

We believe that both options provide the following benefits:

  • Improved and safer roads for everyone, however they choose to travel;
  • Transformation of the high street, persuading more people to spend more time and more money in our town centres;
  • Enhanced public spaces, creating more opportunities both for local businesses and the community;
  • Creation of calmer traffic routes enhancing the look and feel of the area;
  • Improved air quality in the town centre, which will benefit everyone, young and old alike

 

OPTION 1

  • Cecil Road becomes a two-way street again;

 

  • Genotin Road remains one-way southbound, and London Road one-way northbound. However, segregated cycle lanes will be incorporated on either side of London Road, allowing cyclists to travel in both directions;
  •  
  • Southbury Road between London Road and Genotin Road also remains a one-way street, but segregated cycle lanes are introduced on both sides enabling cyclists to travel in both directions;
  •  
  • Church Street is restricted to eastbound buses and delivery vehicles in a single lane, along with a new two-way cycle lane to help create a less vehicle-dominated environment. With much lower traffic levels, pedestrians should find it easier to cross Church Street, no longer having to rely on signalised crossings. Loading and access is also maintained for businesses (including the market square).

 

Option 1 has been shortlisted as we believe it will deliver the following benefits:

    • Significantly reduced traffic along Church Street, making it easier for pedestrians to cross the road thereby improving the environment for everyone visiting the town centre;
    • A more attractive high street, with new trees planted and improved public spaces;
    • High quality cycle facilities; and
    • Reduced bus journey times along Church Street

As a result of Option 1:

    • More traffic will flow along Cecil Road;
    • There will be some delay for general traffic and buses not using Church Street. However, this situation should improve over time as short journey car use reduces. In addition, some people will re-time their journeys or find alternative routes at the busiest times; and There will be a slight reduction in the pavement width, east of the market on Church Street

 

OPTION 6A

  • Cecil Road becomes a two-way street again. London Road between Southbury Road and Cecil Road also becomes two-way, with segregated cycle lanes on both sides of the road;

 

  • Genotin Road remains a one-way street for general traffic, but includes a segregated southbound cycle lane;
  •  
  • Southbury Road between London Road and Genotin Road becomes two-way, with westbound traffic restricted to cycles, buses and delivery vehicles; and

 

  • Church Street is restricted to buses and delivery vehicles, to help create a less vehicle-dominated environment, but two-way traffic is retained. However, a raised two-way cycle lane is provided in the centre of the road, separating the two traffic lanes. With much lower traffic levels, pedestrians should find it easier to cross Church Street, no longer having to rely on signalised crossings. Though there will be less space for loading and unloading at the western end of Church Street and in London Road, loading and access is retained for businesses (including the market square) along the rest of Church Street

 

Option 6a has been shortlisted as we believe it will deliver the following benefits:

    • Significantly reduced traffic levels along Church Street, making it easier for pedestrians to cross the road and improving the environment for everyone visiting the town centre;
    • A more attractive high street, enhanced with new trees and improved public spaces;
    •  
  • High quality cycle facilities; and
    • Improved bus access to the town centre with reduced journey times
    • As a result of Option 6a:
    •  
    • More traffic will flow along Cecil Road;
    • There will be some delay for general traffic and buses not using Church Street. However, this situation should gradually improve over time as short journey car use reduces. In addition, some people will re-time their journeys or find alternative routes at the busiest times; and  
    • There will be a slight reduction in the pavement width east of Little Park Gardens on Church Street

What were the other options? Why are they not going forward for consultation?

Several options have been developed for the Enfield Town scheme. However, these have now been reduced to the two options described above. Four other options have been considered but will not be taken any further. Because the other options would not be funded by TfL, and therefore could not be implemented, they will not form part of the consultation process.

The other options that were considered, and the reasons why they have been rejected, are as follows:

Option 2 – this is similar to Option 1 (which has been shortlisted), and reflects the design that was shown in the original bid. Church Street would be restricted to eastbound buses, and there would be a two-way segregated cycle track along the whole length. Cecil Road would become a two-way street. The difference between this and Option 1 is that eastbound ‘general traffic’ would reach Cecil Road via Church Street and Sarnesfield Road. The main reason for rejecting this option is the potential for delays to eastbound traffic if Palace Exchange car park was to block back.

Option 3 – this is also similar to Options 1 and 2 but all eastbound traffic would be allowed to continue along Church Street (with a compulsory left turn into Silver Street). Cecil Road would be two-way for its whole length. This option was rejected by the GLA because it keeps general traffic on Church Street, and would not be considered a sufficient improvement on the existing arrangement.

Option 4 – this would retain the existing one-way system but with the inclusion of additional cycling facilities. There would be an eastbound cycle lane on Church Street, and cycle lanes in both directions on Cecil Street. This option was not shortlisted as TfL did not consider it to be sufficiently transformational. Westbound cyclists would still have a circuitous route through the town centre, there would be reduced footway widths on Church Street, and motor traffic would continue to dominate the main shopping area. There would also be limited opportunity to make improvements to public space.

Option 5 – this is similar to Option 1 but with London Road closed to motor traffic between Cecil Road and Church Street, and two-way working on Genotin Road. London Road and Church Street would have two-way cycling provision, and Church Street would also allow eastbound bus travel. Cecil Road would be two-way along its entire length. This option was rejected due to its predicted large impact on traffic congestion (traffic would need to drop by more than 50% for it to be workable).

Option 6 – this would have ‘shared space’ along Church Street and London Road, with two way provision for buses and cycles on Church Street, and two way for general traffic on Cecil Road and London Road. Signals would be removed from the junctions of Silver Street and Church Street, and Genotin Road and Southbury Road. This option was rejected because of the predicted impact on traffic congestion – a 40% reduction in traffic would be needed for the layout to work satisfactorily. Other disadvantages are that there would be limited benefit for cyclists at the shared space junctions, increased traffic on Cecil Road, informal crossings at junctions which would be opposed by groups representing visually impaired groups, and loading would need to be relocated to side streets at the western end of Church Street. Enfield Council still had an aspiration to develop a ‘Shared Space’ option and a variation of the option was investigated which looked to retain the ‘Shared Space’ approach on Church Street but with signals retained at the junctions of Silver Street and Church Street, and Genotin Road and Southbury Road, to reduce and traffic congestion, which resulted in Option 6a, which is being consulted on.

Proposed changes to Raleigh Road, Sydney Road & Essex Road

Please see below to provide more detail on the impact of the Enfield Town proposals on Raleigh Road, Sydney Road & Essex Road. These are just proposals, the purpose of the consultation is to gain feedback so please provide specific comment on this as part of your consultation response if you support, have concerns, or have alternative suggestions to offer.

Raleigh Road, Sydney Road & Essex Road

Request a Paper Version

Your Name

Your Address:

Version:

 Request a copy of all drawings

captcha
Please enter the characters you see above: